nazionali



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29.12.2017
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  • nazionali)

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Sul lessico (anche nel discorso non scientifico):

  • Sul lessico (anche nel discorso non scientifico):

  • maggiore penetrazione e diffusione di prestiti non adattatati e di prestiti “di lusso”

  • Sul discorso (scientifico):

  • perdita, acquisto, riadattamento di generi testuali

  • riaggiustamenti stilistici (es., strutturazione del discorso; trattamento dell’ “io” nel discorso scientifico; indebolimento dell’uso delle note come discorso di secondo livello o aside, ecc.)

  • Sulla morfosintassi (anche nel discorso non scientifico):

  • - Apparizioni sporadiche di costruzioni sintagmatiche anomale per l’italiano (es., costruzioni “ammazza preposizioni” come “lo stress lavoro-dipendente”,- cfr. con “il Trapattoni pensiero” o “la Berlusconi maniera”)





[...] There is little evidence that English poses an existential threat to the standardised national languages of European states, even the smaller ones (e.g. Norwegian), for, despite globalisation, these still retain sufficient autonomy to implement protectionist policies, reserving a privileged place for national languages in such public domains as education and administration. Additionally, these national languages index valued identities to an extent that English, an instrumental lingua franca cannot (Oakes, 2005), this considerably reducing the likelihood of any wholesale language shift.

  • [...] There is little evidence that English poses an existential threat to the standardised national languages of European states, even the smaller ones (e.g. Norwegian), for, despite globalisation, these still retain sufficient autonomy to implement protectionist policies, reserving a privileged place for national languages in such public domains as education and administration. Additionally, these national languages index valued identities to an extent that English, an instrumental lingua franca cannot (Oakes, 2005), this considerably reducing the likelihood of any wholesale language shift.

  • But this argument does not address the principal concern of most commentators, which is not so much of English “killing” other languages as of relegating them to a lesser role in an incipient global diglossia where indigenous national languages are left, in Pennycook’s (2000) words as “static markers of identity”, as languages of informal, less prestigious domains, with English in control of high prestige domains of higher education, scientific communication and transnational business. Such points tend to be made most forcefully, and most pertinently, with respect to scientific communication, the concern reaching its greatest intensity in smaller countries, such as in Scandinavia, where English has made the greatest inroads. For example, commenting on the situation in Sweden, Gunnarsson (2001) suggests that the trend to increased publication of research in English will lead eventually to register atrophy; that is, as scientific writing in Swedish or other languages declines, there will be a slow impoverishment of the language’s lexical and stylistic resources through under-use, just as a limb withers if not exercised.

  • (G. Ferguson 2007: 15; grassetto mio)



  • [...] A diglossic situation with one specific language serving as the carrier of written research in science and humanities is by no means a threat to the survival of our respective mother tongues. As Europeans we have to be bi- or trilingual anyway. [...]

  • In my view, the only major problem remaining is the extent to which our oral teaching should be in vernacular or in a foreign language, too. As an expert in literacy, my advice would be that, while in principle teaching is possible in any language, texts produced in undergraduate studies should preferably be written in vernacular (otherwise the vernacular language could lose some of its qualities as a language of written research and of written science).

  • At the latest from doctoral theses onward, the results of true research (in science this means starting from articles in journals), we should be reminiscent of the benefits of scientific diglossia, thus writing preferably in English. Nevertheless, the choice of the appropriate language will always depend on the particular situation. [...] (pp. 4-5)

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